Shino Over

I thought I would post the following images of Chawan and Yunomi I’ve made over the years using Shino over other glazes. The old saying is “shino first or suffer the curse”, the curse being bubbles and blisters in and on the finished glaze surface of a pot. I’ve been working with shino over other glazes for the last 16 years and the sample shown here represent works that span that time period. All the examples were fired to ∆10 (2345F) in reduction in my 20 cubic foot updraft natural gas kiln. (I apologize, in advance, for the poor quality of some of the images. They were taken before I developed the necessary photography skills, way back then).

***Please Click on Images to Enlarge***

Thanks for looking and don’t hesitate to leave any questions you may have in the comment section below this post.

White Shino over Chun Red, notice the 3-D effect of the folded over shino in the first image

Malcolm Davis CT Shino with Soda Ash over Alberta Slip.

Malcolm Davis CT Shino with Soda Ash over Alberta Slip.

Malcolm Davis CT Shino with Soda Ash over V.C. Satin Doll Black.

Troy Shino over Ash Tenmoku.

Malcolm Davis CT Shino with Soda Ash over Alberta Slip. The left image is the first firing and the right image is the same piece twice fired.

Malcolm Davis CT Shino with Soda Ash over Alberta Slip.

Red Shino over Alberta Slip and a Rutile glaze.

Malcolm Davis CT Shino with Soda Ash over Alberta Slip and Tenmoku.

Malcolm Davis CT Shino with Soda Ash over Alberta Slip.

Red Shino over Crackle Slip over Alberta Slip.

Shino over Alberta Slip.

Shino over Alberta Slip and Tenmoku.

Malcolm Davis CT Shino with Soda Ash over Alberta Slip.

Close-up of Shino with Soda Ash over Ash Tenmoku.

Cup on the right: Malcolm Davis CT Shino with Soda Ash over Alberta Slip

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18 Responses to Shino Over

  1. ang says:

    amazing layering comparisons!! I am a bit partial to shino myself :))

  2. Judy Robbins says:

    These are all beautiful, Michael. I am especially partial to the shino over Chun Red but I am partial to anything with the right red in it and this has it. Although I know nothing about the process, I can appreciate the result. Each cup asks to be picked up, turned and gazed into, not as into glass, but as into a 3-D world as you say.

  3. Gail Hershey says:

    I don’t know Michael. I guess I am not very sophisticated. I think they are all pretty interesting.

  4. Anonymous says:

    I Love them all! I am partial to an interesting cup , and I could enjoy a cup of tea in any of these with plenty of interaction between me and the cup, as I could look at them for hours! Great work! I am inspired!

  5. Zygote says:

    I’m so going to try a few of these Michael.

  6. Michael says:

    Spectacular finishes. You don’t say whether you experienced any of the “cursed” effects of shino over other glazes. Are these shots exceptions to the rule? Or do you disagree with the rule?

  7. Anonymous says:

    Beautiful

  8. Anonymous says:

    Hi…nice photos..Ive used shino over and under for years…Its great for making yellows.

  9. Anonymous says:

    Wonderful. All of them.

  10. ceramicfeet says:

    beautiful pieces. What about in an electric kiln? Do use electric also?

  11. Are the “bubbles and blisters in and on the finished glaze surface of a pot” a result of the cooling process? Do you cool down at a slower rate?

  12. Joan Scott says:

    These are all wonderful results. I am firing electric and have shinos from wood firings. I thought to try some layering to see what might happen before reading this posting. For sure this prompting will push me on. I really hope to construct a wood fire kiln. Looking at what Jeff Campana did with a Manabigama kiln recently buildt.

  13. Jana says:

    Hi Michael, love your work. i have started using other glazes over shino after seing your work. Can i get a Malcom Davis CT shino recepie? thank you

  14. Melanie Unruh says:

    I’m curious as to the use of soda ash. Are you sifting it on the slip or tenmoku glaze? Or stirring it into the shino?

    I’ve got a wood firing coming up in a few weeks and am experimenting with shinos. Thanks!

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